Welcome to Lecompton Kansas

About Lecompton

Lecompton was founded in 1854 and platted on a bluff on the south bank of the Kansas River. It was originally called "Bald Eagle," but then later changed to Lecompton in honor of Samuel D. Lecompte, the chief justice of the territorial supreme court. In 1855, the town... read more

Antonio de la Cova's Bleeding Kansas

http://www.latinamericanstudies.org/bleeding-kansas.htm

Bleeding Kansas Characters

Bleeding Kansas Characters

Video

Historic Lecompton was recently featured on Fox 4 KC

Lecompton Historical Society president Paul Bahnmaier discusses the city of Lecompton along with the new motion picture, "Lincoln."

Full story: http://fox4kc.com/2012/11/15/lecompton-hopes-movie-puts-them-back-on-the-historical-map/

 

 

Battle of Fort Titus

Video of a reenactment of the Battle of Fort Titus, recorded at Territorial Days 2012.

Where is Lecompton?

Located on the bank of the Kaw River, in between Topeka, the State capital, and Lawerence, the abloitionist headquarters during Bleeding Kansas, Lecompton was at the center of territorial and national politics during the 1850's.

More Information

Download a copy of the Historic Lecompton Kansas informational brochure.

Return the Capital

Return the capitalIn August 1855, the territorial legislature meeting at the Shawnee Indian Mission voted to make Lecompton the permanent capital city of Kansas Territory. For nearly six years Lecompton served as the only official capital city. But by 1861 and statehood, the capital was removed to Topeka.

Lecompton was founded in 1854 and platted on a bluff on the south bank of the Kansas River. It was originally called "Bald Eagle," but then later changed to Lecompton in honor of Samuel D. Lecompte, the chief justice of the territorial supreme court.

Stop by the Territorial Capital/Lane Museum to pick up your free "Return Capital to Lecompton" bumper sticker.

Read about our efforts to host the 2011 KS Legislature
Honoring History

Camp Sackett: Ground Zero in 1856, A Quarry in 2005?

Read about the efforts by the Lecompton Historical Society to prevent the Camp Sackett site from becoming a mining quarry here.

The Bald Eagle archives now available online

The Bald Eagle The Bald Eagle is the quarterly publication of the Lecompton Historical Society. The publication includes in-depth articles about the major role Lecompton played as the capital of Kansas Territory and the significant impact it had in the coming United States Civil War. Also included are histories of surrounding communities, churches, schools, early settlers, local celebrations and other articles related to the Territorial Capital of Kansas.
View Bald Eagle archives.

Middle School Fieldtrip - History Standards Program

Meet Kansas Territorial Characters

The Fort Titus Cabin

The Lecompton Historical Society, with funds generously provided by the Wayne and Maybelle Slavens Hall Fund, has constructed a representation of Henry Titus' cabin that sits 100 yards southeast of the Museum. It was designed collectively by the Lecompton Historical Society's Board of Directors. See the pictures.

Photos from the Hunley Crew Funeral

On April 17, 2004, a funeral services were held for the Hunley Crew in Charleston. Howard Duncan took several great pictures of the service and the period clothing.

Lecompton Reenactors and Gov. Kathleen Sebelius

Governor Kathleen Sebelius and the Lecompton Reenactors At the request of Governor Kathleen Sebelius, the Lecompton Reenactors performed in the Kansas Statehouse on Kansas Day, January 29th, 2004. View a larger photo of the Lecompton Reenactors in the governor's office.

Upset Victory at Mahaffie: Kansas Free State Party Prevails

On April 17 & 18, 2004, Mahaffie Stagecoach Stop and Farm in Olathe hosted "Civil War on the Border." Over 2,800 spectators attended this free, weekend festival and over 100 Civil War reenactors, territorial civilian reenactors, period sutlers, pioneer skill demonstrators, and musicians participated... read more

Lecompton in the News

Lecompton was recently featured in a Slate Magazine Article.